Philadelphia Newspapers LLC Files for Bankruptcy

dan's picture
Cajunmoon's picture

I think it is a sign of the

I think it is a sign of the times. In the future I predict the downfall of the newspaper as we knew it in favor of the internet and othe media as their replacement.

codergrrl's picture

I agree. No one reads the

I agree.
No one reads the newspaper anymore. (Besides, if you try, you have to deal with the cheap paper that is so thin, it rolls up, and causes general consternation.)

jmminarik's picture

The Metro,being free to

The Metro,being free to consumers, also eats away at the reader base. Those who might buy a daily for their commute might satisfy their reading needs with the Metro.

amberstreet's picture

oh nooooo I love to read the

oh nooooo I love to read the paper in the paper form please do not fold....

jobber's picture

The bankruptcy does not

The bankruptcy does not include the Star publications. Only the Inquirer and Daily News.

nick-bug's picture

jmminarik wrote:The

jmminarik wrote:

The Metro,being free to consumers, also eats away at the reader base...

Making matters worse, the Inquirer is not the paper that it once was. Too many of the best writers have left the paper. I've opted to subscribe to the NY Times rather than the Inquirer, because I just don't find that much interesting material in the Inquirer... which is sad, because I'd prefer to support a local paper with a focus on local news.

dan's picture

jobber wrote:The bankruptcy

jobber wrote:

The bankruptcy does not include the Star publications. Only the Inquirer and Daily News.

Really?

I know the article doesn't mention the Star publications, but aren't they owned by Philadelphia Newspapers LLC?

george's picture

Print versions may well be

Print versions may well be headed the way of pay telephones and the milkman. It's just become virtually impossible for them to turn a profit anymore.

Here at home, I think it's likely that one of the major dailies will fold eventually---almost certainly the Daily News---and simply be 'folded' into the bigger Inquirer. It's not a solution to the revenue crisis by any means, but simply a way of reducing overall costs.

My own buying habits are probably similar to many other people. Years ago (back in South Florida) I used to religiously buy both major dailies each day but today the only print newspaper I purchase is the Sunday NY Times and get my news fix the rest of the week from other sources, mainly the internet.

I doubt that print versions will ever disappear entirely, but almost certainly they will become greatly stripped-down products that are cheaper to produce and staff (and not nearly as good, sadly). That process is already happening, actually.

netable's picture

I read the Daily News Every

I read the Daily News Every day, and I would definitely miss it' I know lots of Seniors still read the paper and LOOK FORWARD to having the paper to read'

I was reading something on the examiner' could it be kinda like this

http://www.examiner.com/x-3132-Philadelphia-Conservative-Examiner~y2009m2d19-Stimulus-puts-hundreds-of-millions-of-dollars-into-billionaires-pocket

Kat's picture

Magazines too I am sorry to

Magazines too I am sorry to say. Eventually they will be the way of the Dodo and I will be out of a job....

I only buy the paper for the coupons.

netable's picture

Kat wrote:Magazines too I am

Kat wrote:

Magazines too I am sorry to say. Eventually they will be the way of the Dodo and I will be out of a job....

I only buy the paper for the coupons.

Kat Your Awesome and you Wont be out of a Job' If' (which I dont believe) the Magazine Market goes to blah' then someone will Sweep you Up, and offer you the perfect job =)

Don't worry when there isn't any need to yet..............

P.S., You can always print coupons out online =)

jmminarik's picture

netable wrote: P.S., You can

netable wrote:

P.S., You can always print coupons out online =)

Where do you shop that accepts them?

Lisa33's picture

george wrote: My own buying

george wrote:

My own buying habits are probably similar to many other people. Years ago (back in South Florida) I used to religiously buy both major dailies each day but today the only print newspaper I purchase is the Sunday NY Times and get my news fix the rest of the week from other sources, mainly the internet.

Precisely. I remember always purchasing at least one newspaper a day, if not two (the Times and a local paper). But now by the time the paper goes to print, there is an updated version of the story on-line. Not to mention you can't cross reference or google with a newspaper.

Lisa33's picture

jmminarik wrote:The Metro,

jmminarik wrote:

The Metro, being free to consumers, also eats away at the reader base. Those who might buy a daily for their commute might satisfy their reading needs with the Metro.

I do pick up the Metro every day, but mostly for the entertainment commentary and the puzzles for my commute. I'm not sure I would buy a newspaper for those things. Plus Metro is really compact, easy to stuff in your bag, and kind of perfect for commuting. No sections to fall out, etc.

netable's picture

jmminarik wrote:netable

jmminarik wrote:
netable wrote:

P.S., You can always print coupons out online =)

Where do you shop that accepts them?

Im sorry, I dont use coupons' at the super market, but I always get emails of them,

The Markets dont accept them?

I have used tons of Coupons from the net for Footlocker' Macy's, American Eagle, etc' and they have always worked......

I just assumed the markets would use them too, Wonder why they dont.......

dan's picture

I know Thriftway and some

I know Thriftway and some others don't, because of high levels of fraud.
(People change expiration dates or change the amount or otherwise just create totally bogus coupons.)

jmminarik's picture

netable wrote: I have used

netable wrote:

I have used tons of Coupons from the net for Footlocker' Macy's, American Eagle, etc' and they have always worked......

These are coupons from the store, not the manufacturer. Easier to spot/limit fraud, esp. since they tend to be '1 coupon only'.

Quote:

I just assumed the markets would use them too, Wonder why they dont.......

As Dan stated, fraud. Coupons from manufacturers are probably easier to spoof, and there's no easy way for a cashier to verify that a 'net coupon is legit.

george's picture

dan wrote:I know Thriftway

dan wrote:

I know Thriftway and some others don't, because of high levels of fraud.
(People change expiration dates or change the amount or otherwise just create totally bogus coupons.)

Well, I may as well come clean here in that regard.

You know the fancy car wash on Spring Garden around 11th Street? They do a great job but the prices are downright outrageous. Well, they used to run discount coupons in the neighborhood weeklies and SOMEHOW a copy of one wound up in my scanner and was printed out repeatedly...long after the ads stopped running.

Last time I went there was a sign on the door saying something about "no copies" accepted. Must have been a coincidence. I go to a cheapo spot by the Home Depot on Aramingo these days.

Hey, at least I tipped well!

Fats's picture

dan wrote:jobber wrote:The

dan wrote:
jobber wrote:

The bankruptcy does not include the Star publications. Only the Inquirer and Daily News.

Really?

I know the article doesn't mention the Star publications, but aren't they owned by Philadelphia Newspapers LLC?

They own us and, ostensibly, the whole company is bankrupt. I was just glad the doors weren't locked this morning!

Brian Rademaekers
Editor
Fishtown Star
brademaekers (at) phillynews.com

Pure_Fishtown's picture

Print versions of lots of

Print versions of lots of media are going to be obsolete.

Already a PC magazine has stopped printing a hard copy and with your subscription you can read it online. There are also quite a few newspapers across the country who charge a subscription to read their papers online. I believe the Inquirer will also start charging for the use of online reading. I hope not but it does seem to be a logical step for them.