Postgreen Building $100K Leed Platinum Certified House

yeah yeah's picture

Doesn't look like much has

Doesn't look like much has been going on at those homes in the last 2 months. They got wrapped up for weather, but then nada.

Anyone know what's up?

sheskrafty23's picture

Actually a lot is going on

Actually a lot is going on with the house. Here's the blog so you can follow along with their progress.

http://www.100khouse.com/

jmminarik's picture

So the $100K home is going

So the $100K home is going to be put on the market for $250K+? :dontknow:

stilljes's picture

jmminarik wrote:So the $100K

jmminarik wrote:

So the $100K home is going to be put on the market for $250K+? :dontknow:

It will be a shame if it sits empty. There seem to be a fair amount of high-priced (for east kenzo) houses just sitting on the market. When DH and I bought our house in June for less than 1/4 of that price, it was the highest EVER selling price of a house in the immediate area.

So I hope it fills up. Mostly so I can stop feeling so stupid about that.

neilpuck's picture

jmminarik wrote:So the $100K

jmminarik wrote:

So the $100K home is going to be put on the market for $250K+?

If you read the article closely, it says that it COSTS 100k to BUILD, not to sell. They're talking materials and technology. Not including land which probably cost them about 50-75k for the lot, and their deserved profit.

http://neilpuck.smugmug.com

jmminarik's picture

neilpuck wrote:jmminarik

neilpuck wrote:
jmminarik wrote:

So the $100K home is going to be put on the market for $250K+?

If you read the article closely, it says that it COSTS 100k to BUILD, not to sell. They're talking materials and technology. Not including land which probably cost them about 50-75k for the lot, and their deserved profit.

http://neilpuck.smugmug.com

I built a $3 spiffy widget, cheaper than the previous $6 spiffy widget. I'm gonna sell it to you for $10. Which price as a consumer do you care about?

roma258's picture

jmminarik wrote:neilpuck

jmminarik wrote:
neilpuck wrote:
jmminarik wrote:

So the $100K home is going to be put on the market for $250K+?

If you read the article closely, it says that it COSTS 100k to BUILD, not to sell. They're talking materials and technology. Not including land which probably cost them about 50-75k for the lot, and their deserved profit.

http://neilpuck.smugmug.com

I built a $3 spiffy widget, cheaper than the previous $6 spiffy widget. I'm gonna sell it to you for $10. Which price as a consumer do you care about?

Good luck finding a newly constructed, LEED Platinum certified home for under $265K.

2014 susquehanna's picture

stilljes wrote:jmminarik

stilljes wrote:
jmminarik wrote:

So the $100K home is going to be put on the market for $250K+? :dontknow:

It will be a shame if it sits empty. There seem to be a fair amount of high-priced (for east kenzo) houses just sitting on the market. When DH and I bought our house in June for less than 1/4 of that price, it was the highest EVER selling price of a house in the immediate area.

So I hope it fills up. Mostly so I can stop feeling so stupid about that.

Actually, there was a home on York (East Kenso) that sold a couple years back for 270K. I know of several that have sold in the high 100's. You can get more house for your buck in EK but these homes are not your standard property.

jbette01's picture

roma258 wrote: Good luck

roma258 wrote:

Good luck finding a newly constructed, LEED Platinum certified home for under $265K.

Give it 10 years, I would bet the majority of new residential constuction will be LEED certified or built to basic LEED standards. European standards (like Germany's Passivhaus or Switzerland's) blow the US standards away, and in general the US follows behind Europe in building trends.

Truthfully, some may disagree, but I think getting the actually certification is a bunch of PR. Postgreen could have save some $$$ (usually to the tune of thousands of dollars) NOT getting the certification, although it would still be built to the standards. I am not knocking what folks like Postgreen, Onion Flats and Digsau are doing, they are setting the bar very high for changing neighborhoods. But as the LEED criteria continues to get tighter every few years, the bar will continually be raised.

I really don't want to see every existing lot razed to put up a LEED home (although great if something is built over blight/empty lot). It would be nice, once we get out of this economy mess, to see more aggressive incentives (tax credits or otherwise) to retrofit existing homes. Retrofitting a house for a green roof is typically MUCH more expensive (square footage wise) than designing and building one in a new project. Plus wouldnt it be so cute to see the little fishtown grandmas watering their flowers from rain barrels? Awwwwwwwwwwwwww!

marmkid's picture

jbette01 wrote:roma258

jbette01 wrote:
roma258 wrote:

Good luck finding a newly constructed, LEED Platinum certified home for under $265K.

Give it 10 years, I would bet the majority of new residential constuction will be LEED certified or built to basic LEED standards. European standards (like Germany's Passivhaus or Switzerland's) blow the US standards away, and in general the US follows behind Europe in building trends.

yeah, European standards are much higher than US standards, and hopefully we will continue to follow them
hopefully in 10 years, the LEED standards of today will just be building standards and we wont be concerned with "LEED"

part of the reason LEED homes are more money is the "newness" of this type of construction
hopefully once it becomes much more common and contractors and vendors have done many homes this way, it will then become more cost effective to build homes in that way
unfortunately, it will just take time, and hopefully it is all moving in the right direction

jbette01 wrote:

Truthfully, some may disagree, but I think getting the actually certification is a bunch of PR. Postgreen could have save some $$$ (usually to the tune of thousands of dollars) NOT getting the certification, although it would still be built to the standards. I am not knocking what folks like Postgreen, Onion Flats and Digsau are doing, they are setting the bar very high for changing neighborhoods. But as the LEED criteria continues to get tighter every few years, the bar will continually be raised.

it is complete PR, you are right about that
I am an architect and am also LEED certified, and to be honest, it doesnt mean that much
LEED in general is really the most useful in the awareness that it brings to the general public
the bar should get raised every few years, hopefully to the point where most of these LEED points become building code requirements and nothing more

i have worked on a couple projects that are becoming LEED certified, and the owners have a complete seperate budget to put towards earning LEED points
the reason they do so, is complete PR of saying they have a "green" and LEED certified building
while that isnt exactly the best reason to do this, it also is a million times better than not doing anything at all
and most clients would actually like to be "green" as it is the right thing to do, and gives them a better building
but how can you justify paying more for something that isnt required by code?
that is where you need the "LEED" PR stamp

jbette01 wrote:

I really don't want to see every existing lot razed to put up a LEED home (although great if something is built over blight/empty lot). It would be nice, once we get out of this economy mess, to see more aggressive incentives (tax credits or otherwise) to retrofit existing homes. Retrofitting a house for a green roof is typically MUCH more expensive (square footage wise) than designing and building one in a new project. Plus wouldnt it be so cute to see the little fishtown grandmas watering their flowers from rain barrels? Awwwwwwwwwwwwww!

you are definitely right about this, and i hope houses that are in use dont get razed just so there can be a LEED home there
unfortunately, right now, i dont know if retrofitting a house that you would typically find in our area (a rowhouse) is something that can easily and cheaply be done to meet any existing LEED standards

hopefully once it becomes more common, retrofitting an existing house to become a more energy efficient home, wont be an extraordinary amount of money
hopefully it will eventually be the same as just remodeling your home

it will be interesting to see how it all turns out

theChzad's picture

Hey guys. Thanks for the

Hey guys. Thanks for the interest in our project. I just stumbled upon this thread today and thought I'd try to answer some questions.

1. Yes, we had some trouble getting work done over the holidays, but are finally back on track. If all goes well, you'll start to see the exterior cladding go up in a few days which we are very excited about.

2. Both homes are sold. My wife, Courtney, and I are moving into the 100K House and we have the corner house under agreement. No one should need to worry about them sitting vacant at all once complete.

3. As far as the price, we are trying to build the highest quality homes in terms of energy efficiency and health for the same price as normal new construction in the area. There is not really much other new construction in East Kenzo, but we think the sales price is on par with market rates for normal homes and our appraisals to date have backed this up. I think you will see other developers trying to get more for less in the hood soon for their new construction projects...

4. You guys made good points on LEED. In my opinion, it is too easy to get Platinum although the main reason we were able to was because we are building in an urban area on and infill lot with a smaller than average home. I think there is a lot to be said about LEED taking all that into consideration so heavily.

LEED is a bit of PR, but it also ensures people know our homes are different than a non-LEED or even simply Energy Star home. It's also a lot more than PR in that I've personally spent countless hours on the certification process and it requires a third party to inspect our work throughout the build to ensure we are doing everything properly. This is invaluable to the build process and goes way beyond PR in my opinion. I would pay for it to have a 3rd party check up on our contractors even if we didn't get a pretty award when done...

5. Lastly, someone mentioned Passive House (Passiv Haus) as a better standard. We do not disagree and are actually pursuing this standard on our next project. The next project is two homes at the corner of Amber and Arizona. The corner house is sold to a couple with a young daughter. The other house has not been listed yet, but it will be the Passive House. The Discovery Channel is coming out on Feb 20th to shoot our hood and the progress on both projects. Should be cool.

If anyone ever has any concerns about any of our projects, please don't hesitate to contact me. My contact info is everywhere...

Thanks,
Chad

brooke's picture

Congrats on the sale, Chad!

Congrats on the sale, Chad! I saw it went pending and forgot to send a note! Nice work. It's been interesting following it.

rtsaidred's picture

theChzad wrote:Hey guys.

theChzad wrote:

Hey guys. Thanks for the interest in our project. I just stumbled upon this thread today and thought I'd try to answer some questions.

1. Yes, we had some trouble getting work done over the holidays, but are finally back on track. If all goes well, you'll start to see the exterior cladding go up in a few days which we are very excited about.

2. Both homes are sold. My wife, Courtney, and I are moving into the 100K House and we have the corner house under agreement. No one should need to worry about them sitting vacant at all once complete.

3. As far as the price, we are trying to build the highest quality homes in terms of energy efficiency and health for the same price as normal new construction in the area. There is not really much other new construction in East Kenzo, but we think the sales price is on par with market rates for normal homes and our appraisals to date have backed this up. I think you will see other developers trying to get more for less in the hood soon for their new construction projects...

4. You guys made good points on LEED. In my opinion, it is too easy to get Platinum although the main reason we were able to was because we are building in an urban area on and infill lot with a smaller than average home. I think there is a lot to be said about LEED taking all that into consideration so heavily.

LEED is a bit of PR, but it also ensures people know our homes are different than a non-LEED or even simply Energy Star home. It's also a lot more than PR in that I've personally spent countless hours on the certification process and it requires a third party to inspect our work throughout the build to ensure we are doing everything properly. This is invaluable to the build process and goes way beyond PR in my opinion. I would pay for it to have a 3rd party check up on our contractors even if we didn't get a pretty award when done...

5. Lastly, someone mentioned Passive House (Passiv Haus) as a better standard. We do not disagree and are actually pursuing this standard on our next project. The next project is two homes at the corner of Amber and Arizona. The corner house is sold to a couple with a young daughter. The other house has not been listed yet, but it will be the Passive House. The Discovery Channel is coming out on Feb 20th to shoot our hood and the progress on both projects. Should be cool.

If anyone ever has any concerns about any of our projects, please don't hesitate to contact me. My contact info is everywhere...

Thanks,
Chad

Thanks for the update, Chad, and thanks too for investing in the neighborhood. Can you please come back and update us when the program will appear on the Discovery Channel? We'd appreciate it.

theChzad's picture

Thanks Brooke. We'll try to

Thanks Brooke. We'll try to come back and update before the Discovery Channel. The finished homes should also be in the affordability issue of Dwell Mag later this year.