Will Philadelphia Prove to be Casino Industry's Waterloo?

Fishtown_Dave's picture

Regardless of your point-of-view on casinos, here's an interesting opinion piece from The Wall Street Journal regarding the outlook of the gaming industry:

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB123086359472548321.html

dan's picture

These quotes from the

These quotes from the article sum it up perfectly:

"In locale after locale, citizens are realizing that they were snookered by politicians' promises that casinos would provide a problem-free explosion in jobs and income from tourism. Three casinos have opened in Detroit, for example, but the city looks as desiccated as ever..."

I can testify it's true. I was actually in Detroit and at one of those casinos in April. (No, I didn't gamble. I just looked in the windows from the hallway.)

george's picture

dan wrote:I can testify it's

dan wrote:

I can testify it's true. I was actually in Detroit and at one of those casinos in April. (No, I didn't gamble. I just looked in the windows from the hallway.)

It's always fading and/or failed cities like Detroit that stick these slots barns in their urban core...only to find out later that they do absolutely nothing to stop the slide.

Philly shouldn't think of itself in such a second-rate manner but I guess lack of imagination plus defeatism can make it happen anyplace.

Fishtown_Dave's picture

A different opinion provided

snailgem's picture

george wrote: It's always

george wrote:

It's always fading and/or failed cities like Detroit that stick these slots barns in their urban core...only to find out later that they do absolutely nothing to stop the slide.

Philly shouldn't think of itself in such a second-rate manner but I guess lack of imagination plus defeatism can make it happen anyplace.

some casino $$ to grease the process along also helps.

dan's picture

I was thinking that I wished

I was thinking that I wished the first article hadn't referred to Fishtown as "revitalized", because it implies that changes over the last several years have been universally positive and devalues the positives that were here before those changes came.

Then I read what the pro-casino "industry analyst" says in the second article:
"What are three girls standing together at a bus stop in Fishtown? A full set of teeth! There is not much room for failure in Fishtown so casinos can only help."

The casino industry's disdain towards our neighborhood and towards us couldn't be laid out more clearly.

kdubs215's picture

Is it true the sugarhouse is

Is it true the sugarhouse is breaking ground soon ????

neilpuck's picture

Can't break ground without a

Can't break ground without a building permit. Which to my knowledge has not been issued.

simmer's picture

There are all kinds of large

There are all kinds of large equipment down there and mounds of dirt. Looks like they have broken ground.

Ftown66's picture

Something has been going on

Something has been going on down there. Don't know what. But there is some heavy equipment moving dirt.

Nunzio's picture

george wrote:dan wrote:I can

george wrote:
dan wrote:

I can testify it's true. I was actually in Detroit and at one of those casinos in April. (No, I didn't gamble. I just looked in the windows from the hallway.)

It's always fading and/or failed cities like Detroit that stick these slots barns in their urban core...only to find out later that they do absolutely nothing to stop the slide.

Philly shouldn't think of itself in such a second-rate manner but I guess lack of imagination plus defeatism can make it happen anyplace.

I like this quote from the Wall Street Journal piece...

"So unlike the situation in Detroit, where casino projects could pose as alternatives to urban blight, in Philadelphia they clearly would be the blight."

biggeo's picture

dan wrote:I was thinking

dan wrote:

I was thinking that I wished the first article hadn't referred to Fishtown as "revitalized", because it implies that changes over the last several years have been universally positive and devalues the positives that were here before those changes came.

Then I read what the pro-casino "industry analyst" says in the second article:
"What are three girls standing together at a bus stop in Fishtown? A full set of teeth! There is not much room for failure in Fishtown so casinos can only help."

The casino industry's disdain towards our neighborhood and towards us couldn't be laid out more clearly.

thanks for recognizing that theres plenty good here, always was !!!!!!! i guess i have to read the article wow what a blind statement as far as i know fishtown has always had some of the most beautiful women around.

Bill Kearney's picture

Gambling on addiction: The

Gambling on addiction: The downside of expanded gaming

Thursday, December 25, 2008 6:25 AM EST
By Alex Rose

http://www.delcotimes.com/articles/2008/12/25/news/doc4952e9e043bc9927939102.txt

Expect more stories like this one when our casinos open.

Bergen County attorney admits stealing $4 million for gambling habit
by Mary Ann Spoto/The Star-Ledger
Friday January 02, 2009, 5:40 PM

http://www.nj.com/news/index.ssf/2009/01/a_bergen_county_attorney_plead.html

Gambling problems have been around forever, but with the proliferation of casinos I'm sure we can all agree that the problem has and will excel. Gambling unlike drug, alcohol, or even an eating disorder shows no visible effects, in other words, when a gambling junkie comes home to rob you they won't be slurring their words or staggering, you will never see it coming. This addiction is truly a 'BLIND ITEM.' There was a time in this country when our society looked down upon those with a drug, or alcohol dependency, you would be ashamed, embarrassed to admit that you or a loved one had an addiction. But that all changed back in the day when medical academy labeled these addictions as diseases. So in the 60's and 70's the alcoholics came out of the closet, in the 80's and the 90's the drug addicts came out. Unlike drugs and alcohol addiction the compulsive gambling addiction has yet been diagnosed as a disease, and our society shuns those inflected. The cost monetarily for the compulsive gambler is much greater and their closets are overwhelmed with skeletons that are more incriminating with things like tax evasion, insurance fraud, embezzlement, arson, and in some cases murder. Unfortunately, these are some of the reasons why the compulsive casino gambling problem I talk about is not being addressed. Knowing from my own personal experience that the compulsive gamblers will never come out of the closet is why I work 24/7 to keep them out.

Casino Fiction But True‏ - Open this link - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ieOOZ96rd2Q - and check out how the casino scam evolved into the craze it is today.

simmer's picture

Here is an interesting